Website: www.foscomm.org  Email: mail@foscomm.org
Home
About Us
Activities
News & Events
Contacts
Links
Home
AboutUs
Activities
The Common
Common Facts
Diary
Contacts
Links
Nature Notes
Nature Notes
Photo Quiz
Photo Quiz

To Explore, Enjoy and Enhance

Friends of Studham Common

Nature Notes:  January 2009
Compiled by Pat and Charles

The Common may look very pretty as the frost and snow glitters in the winter sunshine but do remember there are lots of animals that have to survive the cold out there.  Many of the smallest species, insects, spiders, snails and others, creep into sheltered nooks and crannies and just shut down for the winter.  They go into a special hibernating state and secrete a form of anti-freeze in their bodies to prevent damaging ice crystals forming in their tissues.  Prolonged cold is best for these species as unseasonable warm weather may fool them into coming out of hibernation only to be caught by the next cold snap.  Other species stay active throughout the winter becoming torpid during the coldest weather but resuming their normal lives as soon as the temperature rises again.  Sheltered bottoms of hedges, drifts of dead leaves, decaying wood and long tussocky grass all provide vital hiding places for these small animals and also for shrews, voles and other small mammals.  Birds search for food in these places as well so let’s not make the Common (or our gardens) too tidy.  Wildlife needs somewhere to feed and shelter when the going gets tough.

 

See December’s Nature Notes

The Chilterns, an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty - website:

Click on any image to see an  enlarged version

December 2008

Back to this month’s
Nature Notes

Nature Notes
Website: www.foscomm.org  Email: mail@foscomm.org
Home
About Us
Activities
News & Events
Contacts
Links
Home
AboutUs
Activities
The Common
Common Facts
Diary
Contacts
Links
Nature Notes
Nature Notes
Photo Quiz
Photo Quiz
2008
2009
Jan
Jan
Feb
Feb
Mar
Mar
Apr
Apr
May
May
Jun
Jun
Jul
Jul
Aug
Aug
Sep
Sep
Oct
Oct
Nov
Nov
Dec
Dec

Go to previous
Nature Notes:

 

January 2008
January 2009
February 2008
March 2008
April 2008
May 2008
June 2008
July 2008
September 2008
Feb 2009
March 2009
April 2009
May 2009
August
November 2008
October 2008
December 2008
June 2009
July 2009
Aug 2009
Sept 2009
Oct 2009
Nov 2009
December 2009